Solutions and Improvements
Below we have summarized how we try to optimize our project and improve on a variety of aspects important to P2Es and NFT projects in general.

Lowering entry barriers

Many P2Es have rather high entry barriers. Here's the most common types of entry barriers we have seen and our approaches on how to lower them:
  • The financial entry barrier, which however often is necessary for the project to accumulate funds. We resolve this by introducing a "safe mint" option (see Two-Way Minting) where you can get in at less than a third of normal minting price. The funds for the project won't be lost but come in regularly as time evolves from these players, either from buying Gear, playing harder or simply buying an NFT at all (whereas they maybe wouldn't have bought it at normal price).
  • The accessibility entry barrier, which arises from either the value concept being too complicated (too many levels, skills, stats, etc. make it hard for someone new to know which NFTs or items are valueable and which are not), or from being too less experienced to participate directly in the game. The former we solve by using a Rider's overall level as the indicator, which is just one simple, straight-forward number (see Stats and Properties). For the latter most games have scholars in their communities, which take on some kind of mentoring role and lend out their avatars/NFTs in exchange for rewards or recognition. This however often has to be organized externally and isn't part of the game, and as a result may pose a big challenge to new players. Here our lending concept comes into play, which integrates the lending process into the game through a marketplace specifically designed for lending Riders (see Lending Riders).

Keeping the game fair and interesting

Another threat any game has to face is that players lose interest in the game because they're either too good (the game isn't challenging anymore and gets boring) or they're too weak and don't see a chance in catching up with the rest (this applies most often to new players). Our way to solve this is our level re-allocation mechanism (see Re-Allocation Mechanism), which solves two problems at once. On one hand the underlying tokenomics build the foundation of our in-game economy, on the other it re-allocates levels and playing time in a way that the game balances itself in the fairest way, making it intersting and appealing for everyone.
Furthermore, what we have noticed in a lot of P2Es is that new players aren't given the chance to train and learn the game but instead have to compete directly against other players. Although there is matchmaking, low-level players which have played the game at least once still have an advantage over low-level players who have never played before. This is why we have the Snow Parks, where you not only can but need to train your skills before participating in competitions and events. And the way Snow Parks have been integrated into our in-game economy (see Learning Tricks and Snow Parks and Event Locations), you can even earn from training.

Satisfying (almost) everyone

An important aspect of P2Es is the big diversity of roles involved: From players to investors to collectors: One always runs the risk of focusing too much on only one certain group, neglecting the desires of the others and therefore losing their interest in the project. We have analyzed the different roles' motivations carefully and have designed game mechanics which aim at stimulating everyone's desires (see Roles and Market Participants).
โ€‹
Copy link
On this page
Lowering entry barriers
Keeping the game fair and interesting
Satisfying (almost) everyone